Tips for a Pastor Job Description

Many of my readers know our family is in the process of figuring out what God may have next for us following the necessity of closing down Living Stones Church late last year. This has involved scouring job openings seemingly relentlessly. While some of these are extremely well written and likely to produce high quality matches between churches and candidates, many (if not most) are almost comical to read.

It turns out there is a secret manual for writing pastor search postings, and I’ve located a portion of it. I probably should not share it on the internet, but I’ve decided it’s the best way to get the word out on this valuable resource. Please forgive my breach of confidentiality of this classified information, but if anyone else has found additional pages in this manual please be certain to share them here.

Tips for effective job postings:

  • When discussing qualifications, your goal is to strike a balance of having high expectations for the role but low expectations for compensation. Do this by asking for the moon, then saying you want someone with 2 – 5 years of experience. Of course anyone who has actually accomplished everything you want will have far more experience, so you will hire them on the cheap.
  • It is hard to be honest about the crumbs you are willing to pay someone who has spent years preparing for this role. If you believe it must be done, give unrealistically low pay ranges that candidates will dismiss quickly. They do not need to believe that you are seriously planning to pay less than Walmart until they are far down the line with your church and have told other potential churches that they are no longer interested.
  • Sometimes it is helpful to be intentionally vague. In the “description” section just say “regular duties of a senior pastor” or “normal things for a youth minister.” This lets you play the candidate’s experiences against them because what is normal to you is much more work than what they consider normal.
  • If you know you will not hire a Calvinist or an Arminian based on the church history and culture, be certain to avoid mentioning that. It is much better to have those people who are clearly wrong in their theology waste their time and energy and hope on your church than to simply be honest from the start.
  • It is important to send the message that the pastor will not be someone you will lovingly follow, but rather someone you will oppressively direct. Make sure that it is clear that any time he is away from the church building for more than 24 hours you have no less than seven means of contacting him at any time of day. But as a word of caution, be careful that you do not write the job description as if you are recruiting a slave. Indentured servant is the tone you want.
  • Sometimes it is very useful to combine several extremely fuzzy expectations into one sentence to make it seem like you are more precise than you really are. Saying something like “Be an ordained preacher able to preach a sermon in the time allotted, be well grounded in the scriptures and able to care for the congregation.” is good because you cover a lot of ground without actually communicating a single expectation.
  • Make sure you have the candidate submit more information than the Secret Service would require to spend a week alone with the President on an isolated island. Never mind that you will never have time to read all this information from the 50 people who will apply. If they are not more serious about finding a role than you are about filling yours then it shows they are not hungry.
  • Remember to ignore labor laws as much as possible and ask questions that would be illegal in any other role. Find out about family problems early as a way to eliminate potential issues that might make you care for your new pastor as a fellow brother or sister. This will limit the pool of candidates to those who you can force to dote on you as an influential member of the congregation.
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Quick Tips on School Shooting Debate

With all the talk currently going on about last week’s school shooting in Florida, I think it’s important for Christians to use the Scriptures and the truth to inform our points of view. In my admittedly limited experience professing Christians sound a lot like the NRA when discussing this topic rather than Jesus followers. My goal in writing this post is simply to lay down some ideas for us Christians to consider to help us approach this topic redemptively rather than politically. They are as much a reminder for me as they are for anyone else who reads them.

In terms of a factual article covering the nuance and challenges of this debate and its solutions, I commend Ari Schulman’s work here.

Tips for the Christian:

  • Remember that people on all sides of this issue are probably partially right and partially wrong. This side of heaven we will not be 100% right on much of anything so approach this topic with humility.
  • Ask yourself whether your passion on this issue is matched by your passion for reaching lost people (Luke 19:10) and serving others (Mark 10:45). If not, it is probably time for some repentance.
  • Most people are coming to this issue out of anger or fear, not reason. While statistics should absolutely inform the debate, we need to try to use them sparingly and in context.  Using stats from neutral sources can lovingly paint a more accurate picture of the situation that invites further conversation.
  • The 2nd amendment is not God. God is God. While the right to keep and bear arms was important enough for the founding fathers to put ahead of critical things like unreasonable search and seizure or cruel and unusual punishment, let’s not cling to it as if we owe it our loyalty.
  • This issue has a lot of similarities to the arguments around systemic racism. One side prefers to look at specific instances, and the other side likes to only talk about the big picture. Explaining why a particular new approach would not have stopped a particular mass shooting does not prefer others in honor (Rom 12:10) if they are expressing concerns over the big picture trajectory of the issue.

Charitably engaging people with different views on gun control can open the door to discussing truths about sin, brokenness, redemption, and hope.

  • Spend as much time reading the opinions of those who likely disagree with you as you spend finding information supporting the position you currently hold.
  • Understand that within the church there are different points of view on this topic. Loving your brothers and sisters in Christ means making an effort to understand how they arrived at different conclusions than you have.
  • Charitably engaging people with different views on gun control can open the door to discussing truths about sin, brokenness, redemption, and hope.
  • It may be time to listen for some logical inconsistencies in the NRA’s talking points. If we think background checks are wise in 90% of gun sales, what is so special about the other 10%? If someone is old enough to serve in the military but never has, does that really mean they should be able to buy para-military style weapons? Certainly develop a rationale to support these ideas but don’t assume NRA talking points are sufficient to persuade anyone who isn’t already in their camp. They haven’t yet.
  • We owe those with whom we interact on this topic the honor of thinking through the best arguments for their point of view. We should be able to articulate their concerns as well as they do. Would armed security officers really make a difference? (It didn’t last week.) Are AR15s going to hold back a tyrannical government with tanks and fighter planes? We can refute arguments without being dismissive or condescending. Keep in mind that Jesus often cited his opponents’ positions while exposing their errors. (e.g. Luke 4:23-27, Matt 15:5, etc.)
  • It’s important to appreciate the good intentions and fair logic of those who take a more liberal view on the issue of guns. Christians should be the first to commend the commendable. Paul said he became all things to all men in order that he might win some, and part of that means that we are the ones who are expected to change.
  • Consider whether a tweet or FB meme about this topic oversimplifies the it or shuts down dialogue rather than encourage it.

Public policy matters, and we should not give in on what we believe the right public policy is for the sake of being nice to people who may disagree with us. That is peace-faking, not peacemaking. But we should always keep the main thing the main thing, and that isn’t gun control. It is seeing broken people whose hope is in something other than Jesus see their need for Him and put their trust in Him.