Quick Tips on School Shooting Debate

With all the talk currently going on about last week’s school shooting in Florida, I think it’s important for Christians to use the Scriptures and the truth to inform our points of view. In my admittedly limited experience professing Christians sound a lot like the NRA when discussing this topic rather than Jesus followers. My goal in writing this post is simply to lay down some ideas for us Christians to consider to help us approach this topic redemptively rather than politically. They are as much a reminder for me as they are for anyone else who reads them.

In terms of a factual article covering the nuance and challenges of this debate and its solutions, I commend Ari Schulman’s work here.

Tips for the Christian:

  • Remember that people on all sides of this issue are probably partially right and partially wrong. This side of heaven we will not be 100% right on much of anything so approach this topic with humility.
  • Ask yourself whether your passion on this issue is matched by your passion for reaching lost people (Luke 19:10) and serving others (Mark 10:45). If not, it is probably time for some repentance.
  • Most people are coming to this issue out of anger or fear, not reason. While statistics should absolutely inform the debate, we need to try to use them sparingly and in context.  Using stats from neutral sources can lovingly paint a more accurate picture of the situation that invites further conversation.
  • The 2nd amendment is not God. God is God. While the right to keep and bear arms was important enough for the founding fathers to put ahead of critical things like unreasonable search and seizure or cruel and unusual punishment, let’s not cling to it as if we owe it our loyalty.
  • This issue has a lot of similarities to the arguments around systemic racism. One side prefers to look at specific instances, and the other side likes to only talk about the big picture. Explaining why a particular new approach would not have stopped a particular mass shooting does not prefer others in honor (Rom 12:10) if they are expressing concerns over the big picture trajectory of the issue.

Charitably engaging people with different views on gun control can open the door to discussing truths about sin, brokenness, redemption, and hope.

  • Spend as much time reading the opinions of those who likely disagree with you as you spend finding information supporting the position you currently hold.
  • Understand that within the church there are different points of view on this topic. Loving your brothers and sisters in Christ means making an effort to understand how they arrived at different conclusions than you have.
  • Charitably engaging people with different views on gun control can open the door to discussing truths about sin, brokenness, redemption, and hope.
  • It may be time to listen for some logical inconsistencies in the NRA’s talking points. If we think background checks are wise in 90% of gun sales, what is so special about the other 10%? If someone is old enough to serve in the military but never has, does that really mean they should be able to buy para-military style weapons? Certainly develop a rationale to support these ideas but don’t assume NRA talking points are sufficient to persuade anyone who isn’t already in their camp. They haven’t yet.
  • We owe those with whom we interact on this topic the honor of thinking through the best arguments for their point of view. We should be able to articulate their concerns as well as they do. Would armed security officers really make a difference? (It didn’t last week.) Are AR15s going to hold back a tyrannical government with tanks and fighter planes? We can refute arguments without being dismissive or condescending. Keep in mind that Jesus often cited his opponents’ positions while exposing their errors. (e.g. Luke 4:23-27, Matt 15:5, etc.)
  • It’s important to appreciate the good intentions and fair logic of those who take a more liberal view on the issue of guns. Christians should be the first to commend the commendable. Paul said he became all things to all men in order that he might win some, and part of that means that we are the ones who are expected to change.
  • Consider whether a tweet or FB meme about this topic oversimplifies the it or shuts down dialogue rather than encourage it.

Public policy matters, and we should not give in on what we believe the right public policy is for the sake of being nice to people who may disagree with us. That is peace-faking, not peacemaking. But we should always keep the main thing the main thing, and that isn’t gun control. It is seeing broken people whose hope is in something other than Jesus see their need for Him and put their trust in Him.

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