2017 Reading List

While I did not finish my whole list in 2017, I did read a lot. In addition to all the reading necessary to finish my Master’s degree, I also read several books that were timely based on what was going on at work, home or in the little church I pastor.

For 2017, my goal is similar. I want to read books that I would not have normally picked up. After last year, I am better as seeing some of my blind spots and have chosen some books on my own, but I am grateful to those who recommended books as well. I have not matched up the criteria my friend Buffy gave me with this list, but I’ll post how well I do. Here’s the list…

Dairy Queen Days by Robert Inman – One of the book list resources provided by my friend Buffy suggested you read something based in your city or region. Robert Inman is an author that wrote several books based in Georgia. I’ve never heard of him, but it gets me out of reading Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil. 

Jihad vs. McWorld by Benjamin Barber – Recommended by a freind from our old church. The book tries to explain how the battle between consumerist capitalism and religious and tribal fundamentalism will play out. Given it was written in 1995, we’ll already be able to see whether he was right.

Prepared for a Purpose  by Antoinette Tuff – I saw this book at a discount store and thought that since it was something that happened in my area that I had never heard of it could be useful to read. It also meets the criteria of being written by a woman, someone of a different race, a book by someone who isn’t a writer (sort of an oxymoron, but she’s apparently a school clerk for her day job), and a journal/memoir.

Endurance: Shackleton’s Incredible Voyage by Alfred Lansing – I’d read a business book that tried to squeeze principles of Shackleton’s expedition into how I should run a department and it was entertaining enough. This one was recommended by a friend and I given a colleague of mine just went on an Antarctica expedition a it should give me something to talk with her about also.

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot – The same friend who posted the criteria for choosing a book list recommended this one, so if I fail it will be pretty much her fault. (evil grin) Based on the way she talked about it I can’t wait.

One Second After by William R. Forstchen – The forward for this book was written by Newt Gingrich which might be the first time Newt has been forward thinking since the Contract With America in 1995. A buddy from grade school that reconnected with me on Facebook a few years ago recommended it so it should give us something to talk about besides whether Mrs. Colosimo’s nose was real or not.

God & Churchill: How the Great Leader’s Sense of Divine Destiny Changed His Troubled World and Offers Hope for Ours by by Jonathan Sandys – Not sure I will get to this book this year given the backlog from last year. Churchill has always been an incredibly important historical figure to me but I have never read anything on him longer than article length.


Overcoming Sin and Temptation (Redesign) by John Owen, Kelly M. Kapic, Justin Taylor
 – This book is a compilation of three of Owen’s works. I love Owen in small bites, but picking up one large book of his work is not something I would have ever done without some prodding. At 464 pages, it doesn’t quite get to the need for a 500 page book but it will certainly tax me and meets the need for a 100 year old book. I’m thinking I may even give myself credit for a book translated from another language given the need for Kapic and Taylor to basically translate the old English to modern language.The One Year Chronological Bible NLT  by Tyndale – A friend of mine who pastors a large church uses the NLT with his congregation. It is not a great translation in terms of accuracy but it is super easy to read and it meets my purpose for reading the Bible chronologically from time to time. I like to see the flow of God’s movement so an easy to read version will help me focus on that rather than what the Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek idioms mean.

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein – This is Lydia’s favorite book or something like that and she said she’d disown me if I didn’t read it.

You Are What You Love: The Spiritual Power of Habit by James K. A. Smith – One of the things I say most often in pastoral counseling is “100% of the people, 100% of the time, chase what they love most.” This book came highly recommended by people who are highly recommended so I thought it would help me articulate my frequent saying better.

The Count Of Monte Cristo (Unabridged) by Alexandre Dumas – I needed a book that has been made into a movie, and Kristen gave the the choice of this or Pride and Prejudice. It was not a hard decision.

I Must Resist: Bayard Rustin’s Life in Letters by Bayard Rustin and Michael G. Long – One of my goals in recent years has been to read more from people who are really different than me. Sometimes this helps me see things differently, sometimes it helps me refine my own view, and always it helps me be more compassionate toward those with very different views. Rustin was a black, one time communist, gay civil rights leader who died in 1987. President Obama awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2013.

Picking Cotton: Our Memoir of Injustice and Redemption by Jennifer Thompson-Cannino – This book involves a case of mistaken identity where someone incarcerated and then freed on DNA evidence from the Innocence Project reconciles with his accuser and then they both work to right this kind of injustice. Hoping it gives me some additional insight into what it looks like to be on the short end of a justice system that can fail us at times.

Books from last year that I am carrying over to 2017…

A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving – suggested by two very different people so I am eagerly anticipating it although I know nothing about it.

Side by Side by Ed Welch – Author was a seminary prof but his class was on the totally opposite end of the counseling spectrum and he always struck me more as a deep thinker than church body life master so I’m interested to see what he has to say.

Trinity by Leon Uris – Another big thick book of unknown content and style highly recommended by someone I respect a lot who is coming off a major life adventure himself. I figure if someone who’s just had their horizons broadened recommends it, I ought to take that recommendation seriously.

Fools Talk by Os Guinness – I’ve never read anything by Guinness before but I am consistently reminding myself how much I need to focus on being more winsome in presenting Jesus Christ as the supremely beautiful savior and I’m hoping this helps me.

The Reformers and their Stepchildren by Leonard Verduin – A good friend told me years ago to read the book and he’s never gotten one wrong yet. I’m interested to see how much of the Reformation is really being embraced today.

A Fighting Chance by Elizabeth Warren – Certainly not something I’d normally pick. One of the ironic things to me about watching Bernie Sanders is that he’s actually right about many of the problems but has some kind of disconnect in the solution (IMHO). I’m hoping this will both open my eyes to areas where maybe I am blind and also help me understand people on the left side of the political spectrum a little better.

Purpose Driven Life by Rick Warren – Basically the same as the Max Lucado book. I feel like I might be the only person in the western Christian church who hasn’t already read this book. From the snippets that I have read and what I already know about Warren, I’m assuming I’m not going to like it but I think it’s important to see what Christians (broadly defined) are reading.

The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondo – This was the #1 adult book sold on Amazon.com in 2015  and so it may make some sense to see what it says and to see what it says about our culture that so many copies were sold on this topic.